1970.80.33 | Dip net

 
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Dip net
1850-1870, 19th century
50.8 x 223.5 cm
Gift of W.A. Stackhouse
1970.80.33
This artefact belongs to: © New Brunswick Museum
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Keys to History

The value of the fishery to New Brunswick has been tremendous. From Grand Manan in the southwest to the Bay of Chaleur in the north, hundreds of coastal villages and towns sent their vessels to sea. Even the harbour areas of Saint John and Miramichi had a vibrant industry. On the coasts, lobster and herring were landed using traps and gill nets, and then processed and transferred to schooners for shipment. In the Bay of Fundy, with its high tides, herring were caught in brush weirs built from shore, or drawn to the surface and scooped up in a dip net. Salmon, gaspereau, shad and eel nets lined the riverbanks in the spring and summer. In the winter, meanwhile, people tended smelt nets and fishing shacks.

A dip net was used at night in combination with a kerosene torch or lantern to catch herring or gaspereau.

Source : Window on the World: The Rivers of New Brunswick [Web tour], by New Brunswick Museum (see Links)

  • What

    A dip net was used at night in combination with a kerosene torch or lantern to catch herring or gaspereau.

  • Where

    This net was used in Saint John harbour.

  • When

    This net dates from the mid-19th century.

  • Who

    Fishermen used light to draw fish to the surface, and waited at the front of their skiffs to dip them aboard.