1987.17.696 | Beaches' Tourist Camps at Chamcook Corner, Four Miles from St. Andrews, Charlotte County, New Brunswick

 
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Beaches' Tourist Camps at Chamcook Corner, Four Miles from St. Andrews, Charlotte County, New Brunswick
H. W. Beecher Smith
1928, 20th century
Silver print
12.4 x 17.4 cm
William Francis Ganong Collection
1987.17.696
This artefact belongs to: © New Brunswick Museum
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Keys to History

The 1920s witnessed a transportation revolution, with more and more automobiles crowding town and city streets. In the countryside, motorcars shared rural roads with horses and wagons, sometimes to the detriment of both sides. As leisure time increased and road networks improved, so too did the tourist industry. Sunday drives and vacations at the seashore, previously reserved for the wealthy, now became available to the middle and lower classes. Surrounding the great hotels and summer mansions of the wealthy in places like St. Andrews, NB, were smaller operations offering simple rooms or cabins, no-frills food and proximity to beach and sports amenities.

During the Depression years, those with money and jobs continued to travel and take vacations; things were actually cheaper. Those with more limited resources also wanted to escape the gloom of their financial circumstances. During the summer months, the large hotels and small hostels offered employment to the jobless, if only for a few weeks.

  • What

    Chamcook is a European spelling variation of the Passamoquoddy name, K'tchumcook.

  • Where

    A bay, creek, lake and mountain all located in the same region also bear the name Chamcook.

  • When

    The St. Andrews area became a noted tourist destination as early as the 1850s.

  • Who

    Some of the more famous summer residents of the St. Andrews resort area included Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley (1818-1896), Sir Charles Tupper (1821-1915), and Sir William Van Horne (1843-1915).